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Urban Development and Proposals Discussion

Disraeli

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Hard to say without a 2020 municipal census but I could see around 6000-7000 people being added to what the city defines as Centre City for the next federal census. Incredible numbers considering the economy. In fact, it will be better better than the growth from the 2011 to 2016 census when oil was a $100+
 

UrbanWarrior

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I'm just gonna copy the list to this page so it doesn't get lost so easy next time.



We have about 5000 or more units under construction at the moment in the inner city alone. All the ones in the top half of this new list are inner city except the University District stuff, West District, and Westman.


For the new unit count to be included in 2021...

Bridgeland Hill - 101 units
Victory and Venture - 87 units
Liftt - 39 units
Aspen and Bow - 93 units
Avli - 64 units
Southbank - 69 units
Irvine - 60 units
Mission 17 - 57 units
Duke - 51 units
The George - 85 units
Park Central - 462 units
SODO - 305 units
UPTEN - 379 units
The Hat 7 Avenue - 66 units
Brio - 163 units
The Hub - 328 units
Switch - 19 units
Grow - 20 units
Avenue 33 - 36 units
Coco - 76 units
Palfreyville - 19 units
Marda - 66 units
The Edward - 95 units
Columbus Court - 104 units
Marquee - 138 units
ONE6 - 103 units
Bridgeland Crossings II - 143 units
Mantra - 33 units
Aria - 288 units
Giordano - 73 units
The Windsor - 105 units
Cube - 65 units
Maple - 95 units
Westman Village - 862 units
West District - ~500
(Combined various ones along 17 Ave N) - ~400
Subtotal - 5649 units


Versus - 450 units
Mark - 274 units
1215 - 137 units
Park Point - 288 units
6th and 10th - 230 units
Avenue - 319 units
Parkside - 355 units
Concord - 113 units
Telus Sky - 326 units
Lido - 72 units
INK - 119 units
That Hat - 221 units
Verve - 291 units
N3 - 167 units
The Royal - 223 units
Fifteen 15 - 148 units
Centre Green - 26 units
Vogue - 232 units
Ezra - 100 units
Underwood Tower - 192 units
Centro - 79 units
Manor at Fish Creek - 277 units
The Kensington - 77 units
Radius - 200 units
Subtotal - 4918 units


*Likely* be ready for occupancy before May...

Annex - 104 units
Arris East - 200
West Village One - 277
Curtis Block I & II - 700
Redstone - 137 units
933 5 Avenue SW - 74 units
August - 120 units
The Victoria - 90 units
Capella - 142 units
Subtotal - 1844 units


Total - 12,411



And this doesn't even include all the multifamily stuff in the city, just the inner city and denser outer stuff. There's probably double this amount. For the 2021 census, our population density in the urban area will probably increase by over 100/km2 (currently 2,111/km2). Probably even more since virtually all of our development, even SFH, happened within the confines of the urban area (which for Calgary is smaller than the municipal boundaries, unlike other cities).
 

CBBarnett

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Hard to say without a 2020 municipal census but I could see around 6000-7000 people being added to what the city defines as Centre City for the next federal census. Incredible numbers considering the economy. In fact, it will be better better than the growth from the 2011 to 2016 census when oil was a $100+
I think this is also largely a testament to Calgary's inner city being the only market that offers a notably urban lifestyle in the prairies (Edmonton being a smaller but notable alternative). This is often the first stop for anyone looking for a big city in this part of the continent (either by choice or by convenience and moving here or ultimately moving away).

That alone is a major factor behind the success in the area, let alone the inner city/Centre City has made major improvements in vibrancy, attractiveness and housing choice in the past couple decades. While much remains to be improved (and an economic boom would help us go faster) the inner city is larger, more sustainable, resilient and attractive than it ever has been as a place to live.
 

Habanero

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Agreed. It's nice to see the neighborhoods in the inner city thriving during a bad economy. Bridgeland, Mission, Kensington and Inglewood are all alive with new projects, as is the Beltline. A testament to a constantly improving inner city.
I think this is also largely a testament to Calgary's inner city being the only market that offers a notably urban lifestyle in the prairies (Edmonton being a smaller but notable alternative). This is often the first stop for anyone looking for a big city in this part of the continent (either by choice or by convenience and moving here or ultimately moving away).

That alone is a major factor behind the success in the area, let alone the inner city/Centre City has made major improvements in vibrancy, attractiveness and housing choice in the past couple decades. While much remains to be improved (and an economic boom would help us go faster) the inner city is larger, more sustainable, resilient and attractive than it ever has been as a place to live.
 

bgarneau

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Are these communities thriving, or are there lots of projects under construction because interest rates are low and private equity wants to diversify from TO/Van?

I truly hope this goes well for the city and folks continue to come to YYC. Just hard to imagine all of these towers getting filled
 

CBBarnett

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Are these communities thriving, or are there lots of projects under construction because interest rates are low and private equity wants to diversify from TO/Van?

I truly hope this goes well for the city and folks continue to come to YYC. Just hard to imagine all of these towers getting filled
It's a good question - and it's certainly not a universal "everyone is thriving" reality. Definitely some buildings and market sectors are crushed right now, but many are reasonably okay as well.

When we say that urban neighbourhoods are thriving a key point is that 2019 urban neighbourhoods experienced their highest populations ever, this was even after 4 years into a oil-induced decline. Their populations continue to creep up and up and have largely done so for about 2 to 3 decades. This is not a statistic that is typically mentioned in the newspaper headlines speculating on Calgary as the "next Detroit". Clearly there is something else going on here beyond the doom-and-gloom headlines.

I think what's changed is the city itself. It's bigger and more diversified in what people want and what people do. Along those lines, urban living and urbanism are appreciated concepts here now (by our standards) - this is not the same as 1980, 1990 or 2000 in Calgary. So thriving might be the wrong word as a whole - but it certainly is not a story of urban collapse and decline (ironically, in the 1960s and 1970s it was the booms that destroyed urban neighbourhoods, not the bust). It's something else.
 

Disraeli

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Are these communities thriving, or are there lots of projects under construction because interest rates are low and private equity wants to diversify from TO/Van?

I truly hope this goes well for the city and folks continue to come to YYC. Just hard to imagine all of these towers getting filled
I would say so. The units under construction have corresponded pretty close to population growth in these communities, so it's not as thought they are sitting empty. Not to say there isn't challenges with office vacancy and the economy. And we'll have to see if this growth continues through COVID and all the other craziness that is going on.
This is not a statistic that is typically mentioned in the newspaper headlines speculating on Calgary as the "next Detroit". Clearly there is something else going on here beyond the doom-and-gloom headlines.
National media gets a lot more hits with the doom and gloom stories about Calgary and Alberta. The CBC ran a piece about Calgary's economiy a day after the Herald reported on a record year for VC funding in Calgary and neglected to even mention it, even when they interviewed Mary Moran from the CED about the tech industry.
 

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