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Why Calgary is losing its young adults?

Why Calgary is losing its young adults?

  • Too cold

    Votes: 1 4.3%
  • Not enough job opportunities

    Votes: 15 65.2%
  • Conservative nature of Province

    Votes: 12 52.2%
  • School in other cities

    Votes: 9 39.1%
  • All of the above

    Votes: 3 13.0%

  • Total voters
    23

darwink

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That's the thing, we could try to create a not very organic experience driven by catering to convention goers in an attempt to eventually become more of a complete urban experience, or we could add enough post-secondary spaces so that every person that wants to move away to school is replaced by someone moving here for school, and use youth culture, the abundance of time youth consumers have, the willingness to try new things youth consumers have, and the high disposable income allocation for entertainment youth have, and drive an organic experience that might be a tad bit more unique than a cultivated experience to be cool like successful convention destination X.
 

darwink

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I'm one of those whose moved away due to economic reasons. I'm enjoying certain things out o the coast, but would gladly move back to Calgary. I guess I would if I had the opportunity, but as @UrbanWarrior pointed out, there's not much out there at the moment.

Regarding the conservatism and politics, etc.. It's the one thing I don't care for. I can live with it, but I don't like it much, and one wonders if it'll ever change. It felt lie we turned a corner when Notley got elected, and then wham, we go the other way to a group even more conservative than past PC governments. I hold hope that a lot of the votes were purely economical, and that if the economy does;t pick up, maybe they'll be ousted.
Skewing into politics: A huge number of people who had never voted, or hadn't in decades showed up in the provincial election, because they felt an existential threat to their way of life. The meme wars of the past 5 years has been rather motivating for these people, and the tactics for creating chaos in the age of information warfare were deployed almost exclusively by one side to move people down the engagement spectrum (Liking a post that says "don't you love Lake Louise, it is Beautiful, and aren't you a proud Albertan" leads to "Alberta protects its environment, we have these really nice things", leads to "Alberta keeps its environment clean, but Montreal and Victoria dump sewage in the water, we should be proud Albertans' that we keep the environment clean", leads to "These hypocrites that dump sewage say we are dirty", and then "these hypocrites who dump sewage are taking our money, but blocking our resources". ) Then in the run up to an election you keep repeating "candidate X won't stand up to these hypocrites, and candidate Y will tell them they are wrong and we are awesome and that will bring your buddies jobs back, but only if you pledge to vote".

I think entire segments of the population who were never engaged were successfully engaged. And now the extremes of that group feel empowered to express things in public that they felt shame for before.
 

gsunnyg

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That's the thing, we could try to create a not very organic experience driven by catering to convention goers in an attempt to eventually become more of a complete urban experience, or we could add enough post-secondary spaces so that every person that wants to move away to school is replaced by someone moving here for school, and use youth culture, the abundance of time youth consumers have, the willingness to try new things youth consumers have, and the high disposable income allocation for entertainment youth have, and drive an organic experience that might be a tad bit more unique than a cultivated experience to be cool like successful convention destination X.
See, adding a big post secondary school like UofC, MRU, or SAIT to the Downtown/Beltline would do wonders. Simplify living and going to school in the Core would be a much more appealing idea to young adults rather than going to an isolated commuter campus. If any of the present or past provincial governments had their priorities set, they should have and still can expand a campus for Computer sciences or Business into our downtown core. Not only would it help local businesses but it would be advantageous for employers situated in the Core to connect with schools and students more directly. ACAD would be another great campus to relocate. Having creative artsy folks in downtown would do wonders to the whole hick cultural feel of our city. I know under Ralph Klein the UofC wanted to expand into Downtown but they required funding. I guess now we can wipe ourselves with those useful Ralph bucks. :rolleyes:
 

darwink

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Despite the thoughts years ago, moving part of a university downtown is a no go. It just doesn’t work nearly as well as it was thought it would. If you want to do it, you split a school, move one, or start an entirely new one by doing something like an entry draft.
 

O-tac

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See, adding a big post secondary school like UofC, MRU, or SAIT to the Downtown/Beltline would do wonders. Simplify living and going to school in the Core would be a much more appealing idea to young adults rather than going to an isolated commuter campus. If any of the present or past provincial governments had their priorities set, they should have and still can expand a campus for Computer sciences or Business into our downtown core. Not only would it help local businesses but it would be advantageous for employers situated in the Core to connect with schools and students more directly. ACAD would be another great campus to relocate. Having creative artsy folks in downtown would do wonders to the whole hick cultural feel of our city. I know under Ralph Klein the UofC wanted to expand into Downtown but they required funding. I guess now we can wipe ourselves with those useful Ralph bucks. :rolleyes:
They were talking about a DT campus for ACAD when I attended in '05. Clearly that ship has sailed.
 

Patrick.1980

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Because ACAD is a smaller institute there's still an opportunity for a downtown move. It'd be so much harder to do UofC or MRU, but ACAD has a shot. I would love to see it go where Eau Claire market is.
 

Surrealplaces

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ACAD in the place of Eau Claire market would be really nice. It's a vibrant spot and near a future train station (someday), but being in between the natural setting of the river and the concrete setting of downtown, it's a nice location. It's possible a market could be worked into the plan and be next to ACAD? This is probably a pipe dream, but it would be nice.
 

JonnyCanuck

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maestro

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Only the most fortunate post graduate moving to Toronto, Vancouver, etc. will ever have the opportunity to pay property taxes. I have also heard about young people moving out of these cities and to places like Calgary.
 

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