The Odeon | ?m | 4s | Ronmor Developers | McKinley Burkart

General rating of the project

  • Great

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Very Good

    Votes: 8 72.7%
  • Good

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • So So

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Not very good

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Terrible

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    11

MichaelS

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
1,197
Reaction score
4,103
That tree sculpture lights up at night. It creates a nice sense of place at the centre of Marda Loop. The building is a total win for the area. The only downside is a lack of trees along the sidewalk. Not sure if there are plans for those.
Unfortunately not, due to a gas line running right in line with where boulevard trees would normally go. This block is unable to have them, unless an extremely expensive utility relocate occurs, and even then I am not sure if there is room to move the line anyway.
 

jdixon

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
143
Reaction score
148
Unfortunately not, due to a gas line running right in line with where boulevard trees would normally go. This block is unable to have them, unless an extremely expensive utility relocate occurs, and even then I am not sure if there is room to move the line anyway.
Is the gas line directly below where trees could go? There shouldn't be any issue as long as they aren't (and minimal even if they are).
 

CBBarnett

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
767
Reaction score
2,225
Unfortunately not, due to a gas line running right in line with where boulevard trees would normally go. This block is unable to have them, unless an extremely expensive utility relocate occurs, and even then I am not sure if there is room to move the line anyway.
What do good cities do? Like cities that have trees in the pedestrian realm seemingly uninterrupted? Surely they also have gas service as well...

Am I crazy or do some places seem to get their cake and eat it too? While we get stuck with "sorry no trees because of a pipe" explanations.
 

BKha

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
701
Reaction score
752
The rendering shows a restaurant off to the west side of the building, but it looks like Blush Lane has maybe taken all of the main floor space?
 

BKha

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
701
Reaction score
752
I propose they raze the building across the street and plant a forest.
Not that I love the aesthetics of Treo, but I would far prefer they raze the fitness place up the street and replace it with another Treo. Treo has its shortcomings, but in many ways it's a model development for this type of neighbourhood. 5 retail bays all with businesses, a second floor of office space that is in use, and residential above that.
That said, Avenue 33 does the same thing, but looks better.
 

MichaelS

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
1,197
Reaction score
4,103
Is the gas line directly below where trees could go? There shouldn't be any issue as long as they aren't (and minimal even if they are).
There are minimum separations that need to occur, mostly to prevent tree roots from damaging the gas lines, and to allow maintenance access to the lines without damaging the trees. Same thing goes with fibre optic cables, other telecommunication lines, etc...

In terms of what some cities do, well they plan for these things and set them out in their street design standards. Calgary is no different, there are boulevard trees and shallow utility line assignments for each street type, as evidenced in the Complete Streets Guideline or the DGSS for the more detailed plans. The challenge is, those work great for new roads being built, but are extremely difficult to apply to a retrofit situation.

Think of how old 33rd Ave is. Think how long that gas line has been in place there. Yes, it could be relocated, but at who's cost? It wouldn't be fair (or legal even I think) to make Ronmor move the entire line as part of their building development. When Council passed the ARP, they could have also set aside funding to do this, but since they seem to struggle with funding some of the basic "must haves" like water and emergency services when planning areas, I don't see raising taxes to relocate existing utilities to allow for street trees being a winning political campaign.
 

Silence&Motion

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
1,739
Location
Marda Loop
What do good cities do? Like cities that have trees in the pedestrian realm seemingly uninterrupted? Surely they also have gas service as well...

Am I crazy or do some places seem to get their cake and eat it too? While we get stuck with "sorry no trees because of a pipe" explanations.

Calgary have some wonderful tree-lined streets that would be the envy of even the most beautiful cities in the world. Unfortunately none of our commercial streets have nice trees (that I know of).
 

Operater

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
817
Reaction score
109
Hi Group.
Seams Like Trees are always an, "After Thought" Because Water, Sewers ,Utilities are NOT Always Considered in Redeve[opement in Given Areas, Some Street Areas the
Sheepo Will Consider Redevelopement, Others Won't so it will or will not Happen. Good Examples - Power Lines. Take a Closer Look at Power Lines in a Given Area.OK.

Tnx,
Operater,
 

Beltline_B

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
937
Reaction score
1,451
Calgary have some wonderful tree-lined streets that would be the envy of even the most beautiful cities in the world. Unfortunately none of our commercial streets have nice trees (that I know of).
17th have, and fourth Street in mission are about as close as you can get to a tree line Street for Calgary. They are decently treat, but it wouldn't hurt to have a few more.
 

googspecial

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
265
Reaction score
773
Nice mural on the east side
 

UrbanWarrior

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
3,660
Reaction score
9,095
Location
Mission
That's a nice touch.
 

Top