The Livery | 10.36m | 2s | Ansonia | MoDA

LloydBraun

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Between the old Livery, this new Livery, and the silver rain elevator looking building to the east of it, there is some good diversity in Inglewood. You forget how diverse the architecture is in the neighborhood.
Agreed! The strength is in the diversity. I can't stand some of the faux heritage along atlantic ave.
 

Surrealplaces

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Between the old Livery, this new Livery, and the silver rain elevator looking building to the east of it, there is some good diversity in Inglewood. You forget how diverse the architecture is in the neighborhood.
The most architecturally diverse neighborhood in the city, I would say.
 

Surrealplaces

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That's a solid point--it makes neighbourhood character a challenging characterization/description/summary statement
I've been cycling around Inglewood a fair bit lately and have really been impressed by the diversity of housing and commercial buildings, and even the streets etc.. It's a really cool neighborhood for sure.
 

Just build it

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I would agree with Surreal on Inglewood being the most diverse from an architectural point. Any time you have a neighbourhood with new building that have steel tiles, and down the street is an old barn, hard to not to agree.
 

CBBarnett

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I love this design and Inglewood/Ramsay's diversity. My only issue is the size of the neighbourhood being tiny and disconnected as a result of slum clearing, rivers, and railyards. With some solid pathways, infills and density being put in it's helping but I can't shake that it's about 750m - 1km of varying degrees of nothing/hard barriers in all directions before you hit another neighbourhood.

This urban gap creates a unique feel (good) but kind also is kind of isolated and less able to build off the energy of adjacent neighbourhoods as they evolve and densify themselves (bad).
 
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LloydBraun

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I love this design and Inglewood/Ramsay's diversity. My only issue is the size of the neighbourhood being tiny and disconnected as a result of slum clearing, rivers, and railyards. With some solid pathways, infills and density being put in it's helping but I can't shake that it's about 750m - 1km of varying degrees of nothing/hard barriers in all directions before you hit another neighbourhood.

This urban gap creates a unique feel (good) but kind also is kind of isolated and less able to build off the energy of adjacent neighbourhoods as they evolve and densify themselves (bad).
True -- but as a born and bred Edmontonian nothing quite disconnects like a massive river valley chasm. Since living in Calgary for the past ten years I love how this City's little urban villages are relatively accessible by comparison.
 

CBBarnett

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True -- but as a born and bred Edmontonian nothing quite disconnects like a massive river valley chasm. Since living in Calgary for the past ten years I love how this City's little urban villages are relatively accessible by comparison.
Very true. I recently have been spending more time exploring Edmonton. I really enjoyed it actually but you are not kidding. It's like the grand canyon in the middle of the city severing the two densest parts by a kilometre of steep slopes, highways and a giant river. Gives great views but makes my "building of energy from the surrounding neighbourhoods" far more impossible north to south across the chasm.
 

Patrick.1980

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Whyte Ave and area might as well be in another area code, it's so far removed from downtown. We're pretty lucky that the CBD is easily walkable to the cool inner city hoods, with Inglewood being the one that's a bit far away. If the strips of land along the north side of the CP tracks ever get developed, it won't feel that far out.
Very true. I recently have been spending more time exploring Edmonton. I really enjoyed it actually but you are not kidding. It's like the grand canyon in the middle of the city severing the two densest parts by a kilometre of steep slopes, highways and a giant river. Gives great views but makes my "building of energy from the surrounding neighbourhoods" far more impossible north to south across the chasm.
 

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