Crosstown | 87.6m | 30s | Anthem

CBBarnett

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
606
Reaction score
1,435
The towers, the podiums and, everything else are a bore. It's fine for where it is proposed. Damn flood plains. Has it ever been considered to raise the sidewalks as well to the height of the retail?
This will be an un-informed, non-engineer comment but here is goes:

What's the deal with our floodplains and the silly steps up to buildings that are located in them? Surely there are countless cities around the world that are in flood plains but don't do these steps everywhere which do more to kill retail viability / street atmosphere than any flood actually would. I get that this design prevents or minimizes hypothetical flood damage every couple decades, but then what are other cities doing? is our flood risk actually that much more significant/common? Or are we just more sticklers engineering any possible risk out of buildings (as well as any possibility of a reasonable pedestrian realm)?

Can someone more well-versed in flood design, city comparisons and engineering help me out here as to why we are doing this and why (in my limited perception at least) no other place seems to try this hard? Much appreciated :)
 

maestro

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
7,161
Reaction score
1,956
Most places still building new communities on flood plains just don't care which is even worse.

I can think of a few alternatives. Don't build on a floodplain which isn't practical to Calgary. Raise the ground level which isn't practical either. More levies and dams which we wouldn't want either.
 

kora

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
255
Reaction score
642
What's the deal with our floodplains and the silly steps up to buildings that are located in them? Surely there are countless cities around the world that are in flood plains but don't do these steps everywhere which do more to kill retail viability / street atmosphere than any flood actually would. I get that this design prevents or minimizes hypothetical flood damage every couple decades, but then what are other cities doing? is our flood risk actually that much more significant/common? Or are we just more sticklers engineering any possible risk out of buildings (as well as any possibility of a reasonable pedestrian realm)?

Can someone more well-versed in flood design, city comparisons and engineering help me out here as to why we are doing this and why (in my limited perception at least) no other place seems to try this hard? Much appreciated :)
I'm not well versed, but it's to prevent the overland flow of water onto main floors and parkades below. It's only a mitigating design element anyway. I remember the Union Square building on 1st St and 13th Av SW which wasn't flooded but rather water seeped into the parkade from the groundwater. They were pumping their parkade for 2-4 weeks. So even properties that don't flood, still flood if their parkade is deep enough.
 

CBBarnett

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
606
Reaction score
1,435
I'm not well versed, but it's to prevent the overland flow of water onto main floors and parkades below. It's only a mitigating design element anyway. I remember the Union Square building on 1st St and 13th Av SW which wasn't flooded but rather water seeped into the parkade from the groundwater. They were pumping their parkade for 2-4 weeks. So even properties that don't flood, still flood if their parkade is deep enough.
Thanks. I figured as much, but why do we seem to care about this while others don't? Perhaps we are uniquely at risk of overland flooding, but I would be surprised if our situation is particularly unique. The same logic seems to trigger an unusual amount of stormwater ponds in Calgary than other cities too. Sure we have thunderstorms but seems like that is hardly an uniquely Calgarian phenomenon.

I am only interested in this because of what we seem to give up when we design this way: density, accessibility and a successful pedestrian realm. Victoria Park is an perfect example of weird retail design and subpar outcomes (hasn't been rented since it was built 10 years ago)
 

MichaelS

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
1,039
Reaction score
2,874
The towers, the podiums and, everything else are a bore. It's fine for where it is proposed. Damn flood plains. Has it ever been considered to raise the sidewalks as well to the height of the retail?
Could you imagine the height of that curb? Wouldn't want to step off of it, or try to open the passenger side door of a car parked up against it.
 

kora

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
255
Reaction score
642
Could you imagine the height of that curb? Wouldn't want to step off of it, or try to open the passenger side door of a car parked up against it.
Everything is bigger in the West. But speaking to the other point, I believe Houston is considering a 500 year flood in their land use planning since they've been hit bad multiple times in the last 15 years.
 

gsunnyg

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 26, 2017
Messages
540
Reaction score
994
I wish they would only build 3 of the towers and add the removed units from the 4th on top of the the other 3. These towers will significantly extend the view of our skyline southwards looking out from the east so I feel its important they build with that sort of vision.
 

UrbanWarrior

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
3,273
Reaction score
7,095
Location
Mission
I don't know why, but the primary skyline seems so sparse in the above cropped image. Could just be angle of the photo and the significant height of Nose Hill above the downtown core (~200 meters difference).
 

Oddball

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
1,131
Reaction score
1,057
It's decent for now, and it'll become forgettable in the future, but I don't think it'll every be viewed as terrible for the area so long as they're well built. This is another case of empty lots being filled in so it's hard to judge it to harshly when that's what you're comparing it against. It's nice to see a realistic interpretation of Macleod in this render at least.

If it were to go forward largely as is and the Elbow Hat and 25th street revamp were to go forward the Cemetary Hill approach to downtown will be unrecognizable.
 

Top