COCO | 15m | 4s | Sarina Homes

haltcatchfire

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It also needs to be have a rain screen setup behind. Too many situations trapped moisture between the sheathing/wrap and the polystyrene. Then a freeze cycle would further crack the stucco and weaken the system.
 

maestro

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EIFS is being used less and less anyways. You don't need that additional insulation for new construction. It's far more common to see stucco applied directly onto the gypsum sheathing or DEFS.
 

Silence&Motion

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One of the reasons people hate EIFS is because it is often used to cover up beautiful brick facades, making heritage buildings look like cheesy McMansions. See the relevant thread over at UrbanToronto.

I'm not sure if Avenue33's facade is technically considered EIFS, but I think what Oddball is getting at is that a pure white wall in a rendering might look cool and sophisticated, but that same wall could end up looking really cheap and tacky depending on the materils used.
 

AJX

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I like this. I cannot imagine liking it as much with a different colour. Stucco is fine.
Agree with you and Mountain man, Stucco like most materials is fine if installed properly. For low rises, it's not a bad material.

Regarding the overall design, I really like it. It's the right balance between too buy and too plain. Colors are great.
 

Calbusier

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One of the reasons people hate EIFS is because it is often used to cover up beautiful brick facades, making heritage buildings look like cheesy McMansions. See the relevant thread over at UrbanToronto.

I'm not sure if Avenue33's facade is technically considered EIFS, but I think what Oddball is getting at is that a pure white wall in a rendering might look cool and sophisticated, but that same wall could end up looking really cheap and tacky depending on the materils used.
Avenue 33 did use a full EIFS system. I think we will actually see more of this in the future as it a good way for developers to meet new energy code requirements.
 

Calbusier

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EIFS is being used less and less anyways. You don't need that additional insulation for new construction. It's far more common to see stucco applied directly onto the gypsum sheathing or DEFS.
I would actually argue that we will see more and more EIFS as it allows developers and builders to more easily meet the new energy code requirements. The outboard insulation goes a long way with your effective R-value ratings. Stucco applied to exterior sheathing (either gypsum or OSB/plywood) will be going the way of the dodo.
 

Mountain Man

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The new energy code is easily satisfied with high efficiency mechanical systems and appliances. I'm working on several projects that meet the requirements of the NECB and 9.36 (small buildings) without the use of exterior insulation.
 

Calbusier

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The new energy code is easily satisfied with high efficiency mechanical systems and appliances. I'm working on several projects that meet the requirements of the NECB and 9.36 (small buildings) without the use of exterior insulation.
That is true if you are using the modeling (performance) pathway but not if you are using the trade off or the prescriptive pathways. If a developer is smart, they will do exactly as you mentioned above but some of them get caught up in the cost of the model (I know, this makes no sense), and then outboard insulation because one of their better options.
 

Calbusier

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Welcome @Calbusier! Sounds like you’re involved in the development industry.
Thanks for the welcome @Beltline_B ! I've been involved in the industry for the last 8 years. Started in construction on site and am now involved in site acquisition and project design/development. Love to see what is happening in the Calgary development world!
 

UrbanWarrior

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I would actually argue that we will see more and more EIFS as it allows developers and builders to more easily meet the new energy code requirements. The outboard insulation goes a long way with your effective R-value ratings. Stucco applied to exterior sheathing (either gypsum or OSB/plywood) will be going the way of the dodo.
Thank gods for that!
 

Habanero

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I would actually argue that we will see more and more EIFS as it allows developers and builders to more easily meet the new energy code requirements. The outboard insulation goes a long way with your effective R-value ratings. Stucco applied to exterior sheathing (either gypsum or OSB/plywood) will be going the way of the dodo.
I don't have issues with traditional stucco for houses are townhomes, but I'm not a fan of it for buildings over, say 3 floors. As someone who worked doing stucco one summer when I was a student, I got to see first hand how things sometimes get done (or don't get done). Let's just say that manufactured EIFS would be better in my opinion. Too many opportunities for mistakes when doing it manually on larger projects, and when there are mistakes there's nobody to really go after except the stucco contractor or crew, and they tend come and go. At least with EIFS, there is a manufacturer and vendor involved. There's also a specific process for installation, making it more controlled.
 
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